Contemporary Games Can Take Up To Three Years To Develop

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Floyd “Money” Mayweather made headlines last weekend for making light work of Mixed Martial Arts superstar Conor McGregor. But he also made tech headlines recently by endorsing the Hubii Network, an initial coin offering (ICO), on his Instagram and Twitter accounts. This isn’t the first time Mayweather (who’s dubbed himself Floyd “Crypto” Mayweather) has endorsed an ICO. In late July, he promoted the ICO for the Stox project, which went on to raise more than $30 million in its token sale. (BTW: There are subtle differences between an ICO, a token sale, and a crowdsale, although the terms are often used interchangeably. Search the terms to learn more.) What Is an ICO? An ICO is similar to an IPO (initial public offering) in that it offers a certain amount of ownership in a company to the public. In an IPO, a share of stock represents fractional ownership of a corpor... (more)

The Technologies Behind the Games

This article provides a quick look at how the pros are creating games and other multimedia apps on Linux and in the cross-platform space. Any Linux programmer interested in writing games, multimedia applications, or other tools that make heavy use of Linux as a desktop would do well to read on. Most people have heard of Microsoft's DirectX, even nonprogrammers. Many gamers have also heard of OpenGL, which is typically used as an interchangeable term, but in fact is only the 3D graphics alternative to this platform. Other technologies used in Linux and cross-platform game programming include OpenAL, PhysicsFS, SDL, and the loki_setup tool (this one's for the Linux and Unix space in particular). OpenGL - Cross-Platform 3D Graphics LibrariesJohn Carmack at id Software (www.idsoftware.com) is often credited for the survival of OpenGL (www.opengl.org), as from the beginni... (more)

Java Gaming: 2D Rendering

Part 1 of this article ("Java Gaming: Understanding the Basic Concepts," [JDJ, Vol. 9, issue 10]) covered the basics of a game framework. Part 2 goes into more depth on the actual 2D rendering specifics and the resulting demo: the Ping program (see Figure 1). 2D Rendering Game rendering is a subject that has great depth and complexity. This article focuses on the topics that we believe are the most important to 2D games and Java games programmers: Fullscreen and DisplayMode management Buffering Images Video memory constraints Performance tip: intermediate images Fullscreen and DisplayMode Management A game developer must decide whether to run a game in fullscreen mode (where it occupies the entire monitor display) or windowed mode (where it is one of many windows on the user's desktop). Both modes are appropriate for different types of games. For example, a game that... (more)

Toys and Big Data By @JimKaskade | @BigDataExpo #IoT #BigData

“Dad, if my character dies in the game, would I die in the real world?” What a beautifully naive question that my son, Trevor, asked me during a son-dad conversation about how games might change over the years. Earlier last year, Mattel’s CEO, Bryan Stockton, was fired. After three years, it was clear that Mattel was continuing to be challenged with sales weakness, and lower gross margins, which drove down shareholder value. As parents, we ALL know that it’s a very competitive toy aisle, and our kids are much different than we were at their age. Mattel’s toys haven’t been “good enough” at a time when peers like Hasbro and Lego continue to report higher and higher sales. It’s not just Mattel. Nintendo, the one-time market leader video games brand best known for legendary characters like Super Mario, has been struggling to keep up with the times as mobile gaming explode... (more)

JavaScript: Beyond Just Web Apps | @ThingsExpo #IoT #M2M #API #ArtificialIntelligence

JavaScript: Beyond Just Web Apps By Omed Habib The age of computers is over. You are now living in the age of intelligent processing by just about everything else. Like vacuum tubes and tape drives, desktops and laptops are on their way to becoming odd relics of a distant age, if people remember them at all. That may sound a bit extreme, but the fact is that applications are not married to any technological substrate, not even the most advanced mobile devices. That is why smart developers have already turned their attention to using JavaScript for building out next-generation technology like drone controllers, big data management tools, and connectors for the Internet of Things (IoT). The World After Web Apps In Fabio Nelli’s “Beginning JavaScript Charts: With jqPlot, d3, and Highcharts,” he starts off by saying “JavaScript is experiencing a rebirth as a result of t... (more)

Java Games Development - Part 2

Part 1 of this series appeared in the August issue of Java Developer's Journal (Vol. 8, issue 8). JDJ: I'd just like to pick up on that 85% portability goal Jeff mentioned earlier. I'm just going on assumptions, but I think if you were developing a title for the PS2, GameCube, and XBox you would attempt to make sure that only the graphics and audio functionality were platform-specific and make the rest of the game as portable as possible. Seventy-five to eighty-five percent portability would therefore seem to be an achievable goal in C/C++, in which case Java has just lost one of its advantages, has it not? Cas P: Usually I'm even more optimistic than Jeff about something here. I think I can achieve 100% portability. By focusing on a "pure Java platform" like the LWJGL (Lightweight Java Gaming Library), which, once you realize you're coding to the LWJGL Java API, not... (more)

Star Trek Technology for Java3D

The Star Trek universe has inspired many technology ideas but I'm disappointed I don't have a transporter yet. One Star Trek technology that has been available for sometime is the particle system. No, this is not an exotic propulsion system for your flying car. The particle system was invented to animate the Genesis effect in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. While the Genesis device was used to transform a barren planet into one full of life, we can adopt this technology for more modest effects in Java3D. In the Beginning In previous articles, we've focused on creating planetary surfaces with Java3D. One challenging area of graphics programming is rendering irregular or ill-defined objects like clouds, smoke, or fireworks. William Reeves faced that challenge when Lucasfilm was asked to create a planetary creation effect called the Genesis effect for Star Trek II: Wra... (more)

XNA or Game Development for Everyone - Part 2

In Part 1 of this article, we started to develop a small racing game using XNA Game Studio Express 2.0. We learned about the game loop and how it’s implemented by the XNA (by using the Update and Draw methods) framework. We also created our first track on the screen and four cars started moving on the screen, but, sadly enough, they left the track and weren’t seen again. What does that mean? It means we should take a closer look at collision detection. In addition we should design a menu with different options. You might remember that we want to have a racing game with three computer-driven cars or a network game with one or more other humans playing against us. Sounds easy? Well, it’s not that hard, but we’ll see that a few small changes in the behavior will lead to a few other problems that have to be solved (i.e., a game menu means we have to use so-called game s... (more)

SimSTAFF Plays Key Role in Supporting Fidelity Technology Growth

Patrick Callahan, director of recruiting at SimSTAFF Technical Services, said the firm had already secured a staffing contract with Fidelity Technologies, a Reading, Pennsylvania firm that ranks as one of the nation's largest developers of simulation technology. Additionally, SimSTAFF was able to assist Fidelity Technologies in other ways by identifying sublease space for the company to rent for its satellite office in the Orlando area and by introducing Fidelity executives to the local technology community. "Because we work with participants across the simulation and gaming industries, we've developed a strong network that is valuable to us and allows us to add value to our clients." Callahan said. "With simulation, modeling and training as well as gaming being two critical technology clusters in Metro-Orlando, we are fully committed to doing everything we can to sup... (more)

Mobile Application Stores: What's the Operator's Play

Mobile application uptake-it isn't only about iPhones.  Sure Apple's App Store now offers over 65,000 applications, and users have downloaded more than 1.5 billion iPhone and iPod touch applications in the 1st year since launch. But while getting a late start, other mobile application storefronts are trying to catch up.  In the 3 months since launch, RIM's BlackBerry App World has 2,000 applications ready for download. The Nokia Ovi Store is leveraging (and paying 70% revenue share to) the large Symbian developer community to create new applications for its user base. At the myTouch 3G launch, Google announced that there are more than 5,000 applications in the Android Marketplace. Recently joining the party is the LG Application Store, initially targeting markets in Asia.  But if mobile application uptake continues to center on smartphone application stores, how wi... (more)

Google Buys Video Compression House

Google is buying On2 Technologies, an upstate New York video compression developer, for $106.5 million worth of common stock. On2 is going out at roughly 60 cents a share, a 57% premium over the 38 cents it was trading at before the announcement Wednesday. On2 creates advanced video compression technologies that power the video in desktop and mobile applications and devices. Its customers include Adobe, Skype, Nokia, Infineon, Sun, Mediatek, Sony, Brightcove and Move Networks. According to Google VP of product management Sundar Pichai, "Today video is an essential part of the web experience, and we believe high-quality video compression technology should be a part of the web platform. We are committed to innovation in video quality on the web, and we believe that On2's team and technology will help us further that goal." He didn't say exactly why Google wants it. The vo... (more)