Contemporary Games Can Take Up To Three Years To Develop

Game Developer on Ulitzer

Subscribe to Game Developer on Ulitzer: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Game Developer on Ulitzer: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Game Developer Authors: William Schmarzo, Shelly Palmer, Steve Mordue, Qamar Qrsh, David Balaban

Related Topics: Cloud Computing, Virtualization Magazine, Cloudonomics Journal, Open Source Journal, Platform as a Service, CIO/CTO Update, OpenNebula Cloud on Ulitzer, Java in the Cloud

Blog Feed Post

There Will Be a Grid of Clouds

We have a vision about the future of Grid and Cloud Computing

Since 2007, when the term cloud computing came into popularity, we have a vision about the future of Grid and Cloud Computing as fully complementary technologies that will coexist and cooperate at different levels of abstraction in e-infrastructures. Pioneering blog posts like Grid and Clouds are Complementary Technologies, A Virtual Infrastructure Layer for Cluster and Grid Computing or Moving Jobs or Moving the Nodes anticipate the full virtualization of Grid sites, the benefits of hybrid Cloud computing for Grid sites or the use of Grid services to federate Cloud sites. Presentations like From Grids to Cloud Services

predict the future of compute Grid infrastructures, from infrastructures for sharing basic Grid services to infrastructures for sharing raw resources. I think that this perspective, controversial at that time, was, in part, result of our participation in pioneering initiatives in Cloud computing, such as RESERVOIR, flagship of the EU-funded projects in Cloud computing, or OpenNebula, widely used open-source technology to build clouds.


Unfortunately, at that time, a large part of the Grid computing community saw Cloud as a threat and not as an opportunity, and tried to undervalue the advantages of bringing Cloud to Grid infrastructures, probably because they were not able to understand the potential of the Cloud, or just "scared of the unknown". However things are now changing. Last week, EGI (European Grid Infrastructure) organized the User Virtualization Workshop to discuss the future of virtualization and cloud computing in the European production infrastructure. The aim of the workshop was to evaluate the challenges to move towards an Infrastructure as a Service model with federation of resource providers. It is only a very first step, but we are very happy to see that EGI is now moving in the right direction and is planning to incorporate virtualization and Cloud computing to enhance Grid computing and to allow other communities to take advantage of the infrastructure. I think this is a first step to adapt to technology and an opportunity to define a leading position in the new infrastructure arena. After all, Grid will be one of the many services that could be executed on the new European Cloud Infrastructure.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Ignacio M. Llorente

Dr. Llorente is Director of the OpenNebula Project and CEO & co-founder at C12G Labs. He is an entrepreneur and researcher in the field of cloud and distributed computing, having managed several international projects and initiatives on Cloud Computing, and authored many articles in the leading journals and proceedings books. Dr. Llorente is one of the pioneers and world's leading authorities on Cloud Computing. He has held several appointments as independent expert and consultant for the European Commission and several companies and national governments. He has given many keynotes and invited talks in the main international events in cloud computing, has served on several Groups of Experts on Cloud Computing convened by international organizations, such as the European Commission and the World Economic Forum, and has contributed to several Cloud Computing panels and roadmaps. He founded and co-chaired the Open Grid Forum Working Group on Open Cloud Computing Interface, and has participated in the main European projects in Cloud Computing. Llorente holds a Ph.D in Computer Science (UCM) and an Executive MBA (IE Business School), and is a Full Professor (Catedratico) and the Head of the Distributed Systems Architecture Group at UCM.